HE 251 Alissa Leavitt: Find Sources

Research guide for HE 251: Community and Public Health

Final Project Summary Paper

Intro to the Library Website and Library Services (new remote version)

This 4:20 video provides an overview of the library website and highlights the many services PCC Library can provide through its website even when PCC campuses are closed and students and faculty are working remotely.

Find Books, Articles, DVDs, and more

Article Databases

Find Articles with Academic Search Premier

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Video: Find Articles through the PCC Library

Note: parts of this video reflect the old PCC Library website and will be updated soon.

Background / context / definitions / established knowledge

Find Articles with Google Scholar

Before searching, be sure to set PCC as your library in your browser by:

  1. Visiting the link to set "Library Links" settings for Google Scholar
  2. using the search box to search for "Portland Community College",
  3. checking the check box that appears underneath the search to select “Portland Community College – Find it @ PCC”, 
  4. and then selecting the Save button.

This will ensure that when you search Google Scholar in your browser, you will see Find It @ PCC links to full text if we have the article (Google Scholar sometimes also provides links to other free sources for full text).

You can learn more about setting Google Scholar preferences on the PCC Library Website

Advanced Google Searching

One of the best features of Google's advanced search is the ability to limit your search to the areas of the web where the information is most reliable, such as education sites or government sites. The shortcut for this is to add site:edu or site:gov to your regular Google search.

For example, if you conduct an ordinary Google search for nutritional supplements, most of your top results will be commercial (.com) sites trying to sell you vitamins. If you search for nutritional supplements site:gov , the top results (except for the sponsored ads) will be sites such as the National Institute of Health and the Food and Drug Administration, which are authoritative, unbiased sources that are not trying to sell you anything. If you search for nutritional supplements site:edu, your top results will be from universities providing research on nutritional supplements.

Learn more Google Search tips from "6 Google Tricks That Will Turn You Into an Internet Detective" in the New York Times.